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Maple Syrup Coffee

This easy homemade Maple Syrup Coffee is sweetened with pure maple syrup and topped with frothy milk for a hot, cozy and delicious drink that you’ll come back to again and again. You can also enjoy it iced!

If you’ve never had coffee with maple syrup, you’re in for a real treat. So skip the trip to the coffee shop, save a few pennies, and be your own barista…no fancy equipment required!

Here on the old family farm, maple syrup season has officially begun!

For several years now, David and I have continued the tradition of making maple syrup that was started by his grandparents. And since it’s just a fun hobby for us and the syrup is for our own consumption, we still do it the old-fashioned way just like they did.

We put taps into the trees and hang buckets that collect the crystal-clear sap. Then we boil the sap outside over a huge wood fire until most of the water evaporates off, leaving us with that 100% natural golden-amber deliciousness that is real maple syrup.

3 images, one of buckets on maple trees, one of sap being boiled on an outside stove, and one of maple syrup in mason jars

It’s a lot of work, but it’s so worth it because the syrup is absolutely amazing. There’s nothing like it!

We put it on pancakes, waffles and French toast (of course!), cereal, oatmeal, ice cream, in glazes and marinades for vegetables and meat, baked goods, salad dressings, smoothies, and lots more.

One of my most favorite ways to use maple syrup is in my coffee. Not only does the syrup make the coffee sweet, it adds a deep, rich and caramel-y flavor that you don’t get from sugar. It’s so good!

A Few Fun Facts About Real Maple Syrup

  • It takes approximately 40 gallons of sap to make 1 gallon of maple syrup.
  • One tree can produce up to 15 gallons of sap each season.
  • There are over 100 different types of maple trees, but the sugar, black, red, and silver maples are the ones most commonly used to make syrup because of their higher sugar content.
  • Maple syrup season is very weather dependent and only lasts a short time, about 4 to 6 weeks. This is usually during February and March, but it can also extend into January and April if the conditions are right. You need temperatures below freezing at night and above freezing during the day.
  • The different levels of Grade A maple syrup made here is the US are based on the color and flavor of the syrup: golden (delicate flavor), amber (rich taste), dark (robust taste), very dark (strong taste).
  • In general, the syrup is lighter in color and flavor during the beginning of the season and darker and more flavorful later in the season. All are fantastic!
  • Real maple syrup has a higher nutritional value than table sugar. It contains riboflavin, manganese, iron, zinc, magnesium, calcium, potassium, and antioxidants. It’s still sugar, though, so please consume responsibly!
the ingredients needed to make maple syrup coffee, brewed coffee, maple syrup and milk, along with a spoon and a whisk

Ingredients You Need

Note: Ingredient amounts are in the recipe card at the end of the post.

  • Brewed coffee (regular or strong-brewed, however you like your coffee; decaf is fine)
  • Pure maple syrup
  • Milk (whole milk recommended for better frothing and creaminess)

How To Make Maple Syrup Coffee

Note: This is just a brief overview of the steps. Scroll down to the recipe card at the end of the post for the full printable recipe with ingredient amounts and detailed instructions.

3 numbered images, number one is of a clear mug with maple syrup in the bottom and a measuring spoon on the side, number two is of the mug with coffee added and a spoon in it. number three is of milk in a small pot on the stove
3 numbered images, number four is of milk in a pot being whisked to make it foamy, number five is of the milk being added to the cup of coffee, and number six is of the milk foam being spooned onto the coffee in the cup
  1. Put the maple syrup in a coffee cup or mug.
  2. Brew the coffee and add one cup to the mug with the maple syrup; stir to combine.
  3. Heat the milk in a small saucepan over medium-low heat just until hot.
  4. Remove the pot from the heat and whisk the milk vigorously until it is frothy and foamy.
  5. Pour the milk into the coffee.
  6. Spoon the foam left in the pot onto the coffee and enjoy!
top down view of a mug of maple syrup coffee with a spoon on the side

Recipe Tips & Tidbits

  • I most often make this with regular brewed coffee, but you could make a stronger brew if you’d rather. And yes, you can make it with decaf (I do all the time)!
  • Don’t replace the pure maple syrup with maple-flavored pancake syrup. It’s not the same at all.
  • For a stronger maple flavor, use a darker maple syrup. Don’t add maple flavoring, as it can have an off taste.
  • The amount of maple syrup shown in the recipe is just a suggestion based on what I think tastes good. As always, feel free to adjust the amount to what you like.
  • Same goes for the milk. Add more or less depending on how you like your coffee.
  • Frothing the milk by hand with a whisk will result in foam that might not be quite as thick as the foam you’d get at the coffee shop, but it’s still very nice. For the best foam, whisk left to right instead of in a circular motion.
  • I recommend using whole milk not only for the creamier taste but because milk with more fat will froth better than milk with less fat. That being said, you could use 2% milk or even almond milk (you just might not get quite as much foam).
  • You don’t have to froth the milk. The coffee is equally as yummy with the milk just poured right in!

Variation: Iced Maple Syrup Coffee

Allow the brewed coffee to cool down a bit. Then fill a tall glass with ice, pour the coffee into the glass along with the maple syrup, and add the milk cold (no need to froth it for this version). Stir and enjoy!

For iced coffee, I generally suggest using a stronger brew since the ice cubes will dilute the coffee as they melt.

If you make a lot of iced coffee, I highly recommend making coffee ice cubes to have at the ready in the freezer (just pour cooled coffee into ice cube trays and freeze). You’ll have ice-cold coffee that doesn’t get watered down, and you can use regular-strength coffee.

a clear mug filled with maple syrup coffee on a plate with a napkin and a spoon with another cup of coffee and a pitcher of maple syrup in the background

This coffee is great in the morning or afternoon, and it’s also nice to sip on in the evening for a little sweet treat after dinner (use decaf so it doesn’t keep you up all night)!

I hope you make this Maple Syrup Coffee recipe and love it as much as I do. Thanks for visiting today!

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Other Recipes With Maple Syrup To Try

If you make this recipe, I’d love to know how it went! Please leave a star rating and comment below. Thanks!

a clear mug filled with maple syrup coffee on a plate with a napkin and a spoon on the side

Maple Syrup Coffee

This easy homemade Maple Syrup Coffee is sweetened with pure maple syrup and topped with frothy milk for a hot, cozy and delicious drink that you'll come back to again and again. You can also enjoy it iced!
Print Pin Save Rate & Comment
Author: Michelle / Now Cook This!
Prep Time: 13 minutes
Cook Time: 2 minutes
Total Time: 15 minutes
Servings: 1
Estimated Calories: 92

Ingredients

  • 1 cup (8 fluid ounces) brewed coffee, regular or strong-brewed; however you like your coffee
  • 1 to 2 tablespoons pure maple syrup, or to taste
  • ¼ cup whole milk

Instructions

  • Put the maple syrup in a 12-ounce (or larger) coffee cup or mug.
  • Add the brewed coffee and stir to combine.
  • Heat the milk in a small saucepan (I use a 1-quart pot) over medium-low heat just until it is hot. Don't let it simmer or boil.
  • Remove the pot from the heat and whisk the milk vigorously using a left-to-right motion until it is frothy and foamy, about 30 to 45 seconds.
  • Pour the milk into the coffee, then spoon the foam that's left in the pot on top of the coffee.
  • Enjoy!

Notes

  • Prep time includes an estimated time of 12 minutes for brewing the coffee. This time will vary depending on the type of coffee maker you use (for instance, a single-serve coffee maker might take only 1 to 2 minutes, whereas a drip-style pot might take up to 12 minutes).
  • Feel free to adjust the amount of maple syrup and milk to suit your own personal tastes.
  • Use darker maple syrup for a stronger maple flavor. 
  • I recommend using whole milk not only for the creamier taste but because milk with more fat will froth better than milk with less fat. 
  • To make it iced: Allow the brewed coffee to cool down a bit. Then fill a tall glass with ice, pour the coffee into the glass along with the maple syrup, and add the milk cold (no need to froth it for this version). Stir and enjoy!
    • For iced coffee, I generally suggest using a stronger brew since the ice cubes will dilute the coffee as they melt.
    • If you make a lot of iced coffee, I highly recommend making coffee ice cubes to have at the ready in the freezer. You’ll have ice-cold coffee that doesn’t get watered down, and you can use regular-strength coffee.
  • Estimated calories shown is for using 1 tablespoon of maple syrup. Add 52 calories for each additional tablespoon of maple syrup.
Did you try this recipe? I’d love to see it!Share it on Instagram, tag @nowcookthis and use the hashtag #nowcookthisrecipes. Thanks!
Recipe Rating




Mia Evans

Friday 28th of July 2023

I never took into account that maple syrup can be used in coffee because it adds a deep, rich caramel flavor to make it sweet without using sugar. I guess looking for coffee-infused maple syrup will be a good idea if I want to cut out my sugar intake, especially if the product is as organic as it can be. Now that I am turning 30, I am doing my research on things that I can replace when it comes to the food I consume so that I will have a healthier lifestyle as I get older.